This is how I do things

How do I start breeding killi fish

To start breeding killifish you’ll need 2-3 gallon tank, mop for mop spawners (non-annual, and semi-annual species), and a small plastic container with peat moss for annual species. You can buy mops on aquabid or you can make one yourself. I buy peat moss in Home Depot and make sure that no extra fertilizer has been added. You don’t really want to fertilize your fish, after all it might just become fertilizer itself. I don’t boil the peat moss, instead I just add boiled water to it and then let it cool down. After that I put the peat moss in a plastic container and stick it in the tank. As an alternative coconut fiber can be used as bottom spawners substrate. I use a sponge filter with fish that lay eggs on the mop, and a simple air stone along with it. I change ¼- ½ of water every 2 weeks. Depending on the species, I collect the eggs weekly, bi-weekly, or every 3 weeks for peat moss spawners.

Coconut Fiber
Mop

Zoom In
Coconut fiber
coconut fiber

Zoom In

How do I keep killi fish eggs

For bottom spawners I collect the peat moss in a net, gently squeeze it (to make sure that no fish are there), put it in plastic bag, and write the fish’s name and collecting date. For mop spawners that require dry incubation, I collect the eggs from the mop and put it in peat moss. I store these bags in room temperature. It’s a very compact way to keep your fish; you can fit a lot of these bags in a small shoe box! It’s also a good idea to check if the eggs are ready to hatch or not every now and then. For water incubation, I put the eggs in small aquarium with fresh un-chlorinated water, and then add methylene blue, and an air stone.

Net with peat
Net with peat

Zoom In
Plastic bag with peat
Plastic bag with peat

Zoom In
Small shoe box
Small shoe box

Zoom In
Small aquarium
Small aquarium

Zoom In

How do I post killi fish eggs

Well, let’s imagine that you have some extra eggs left over. Maybe you have a good buddy who wants them, maybe you want to trade your eggs with someone else’s, or you just want to get some cash. I personally ship eggs in a small plastic bag in a bubbled envelop. For winter time I add an extra warm layer. Water incubated species I send in peat moss as well, but keep in mind that they are not going to survive long trips; they’ll die due to their short incubation period. I usually don’t use priority or express mail, just regular mail.

Small Plastic Bag
Small Plastic Bag

Zoom In
Breeders Community
© 2013 ComeBackToFishHobby.com